INT’L PHONE: (732) 229-3444 | TOLL FREE: (888) 362-6888

New Look Same Quality, Value and Service

At Monmouth Rubber & Plastics our customers are always our top priority, said John Bonforte Jr. President and COO.

So we are excited to announce our new web site, please visit it. The site is a resource that will add value to your business operation http://monmouthrubber.com/

Here are some items you will find on the site.

  • Our Products

We have several top-of-the-line brands, including Durafoam™, Airaflex™, Duraflex™, and Bondaflex™, Our Buns, Sheets, Rolls, and Foam Tape  have stood the test of time for 50 plus years and are used around the world.

Our Support

Not only are we an ISO 9001:2008 certified manufacturer with industry leading support – we also have free tech support with John Sr., available at http://monmouthrubber.com/ask-john-free-tech-support/, All decisions that affect your business are made 100% in-house. We’re a big business with that small business feel.

  • Our Winning Smile

Since 1964, we have been here for you, with family values that make us more than just a manufacturing company – we apply our family values to our relations with our employees, suppliers and most importantly with you our customer.

So check out our new website, view our current products and services, and let’s continue to be your partner in the rubber and plastics industry. You helped us build this business, and we built this business for you. Have any questions or needs? Ready to order? Want to let us know what you think? Contact us today.


Monmouth Rubber & Plastics Corp, 75 Long Branch Avenue Long Branch, NJ 07740 U.S.A

MONMOUTH RUBBER & PLASTICS CORP
75 LONG BRANCH AVENUE LONG BRANCH, NJ 07740 U.S.A

INT’L PHONE: (732) 229-3444
TOLL FREE: (888) 362-6888
EMAIL:[email protected]

Family run business: Monmouth Rubber & Plastics Corp.

By RUBBER & PLASTICS NEWS REPORT

Monmouth Rubber & Plastics Corp.

John M. Bonforte Sr. and John Bonforte Jr. hold a certificate at the Gasket Fabricators Association’s Gasketing and Converting Expo, held recently in Orlando, Fla.

Founder: John M. Bonforte Sr.

Headquarters: Long Branch, N.J.

Number of employees: 53.

Key family members active in the company: John M. Bonforte Jr., president, chief operating officer.

What it does: Monmouth Rubber & Plastics is a U.S. manufacturer of closed cell sponge rubber and plastic foam.

Markets served: Automotive, medical, sports, construction, electrical, miscellaneous industrial.

Number of generations involved in the business:Two.

What are the strengths of a family owned business? Family values. Our family values guide us in our business operations: How we treat each other, our employees and our customers. We bring to work the Bonforte family values and apply them to all aspects of our business.

What are the challenges of a family owned business? John Jr. is our succession plan. He now owns Monmouth Rubber & Plastics. He grew up in the business. After college, he worked for GE Plastics, learned the realities of the world, and then he came back ready to assume his current role. His having complete ownership resolves many possible issues. I advise; he decides.

Do non-family members hold any executive or ownership roles? Joann Buonomo is the office manager (who has) 42 years with Monmouth. Putting family values to the front is important. All issues are worked out just fine.

How much does the younger generation influence decisions? All four of my children and many of my grandchildren do and have worked at various tasks in the company. They bring vitality and a fresh approach, which helps us to stay focused on the people aspects of business.

Something you might not know about the company: When Monmouth started, there were 13 companies that manufactured closed cell sponge rubber buns. When I said I was going to go into manufacturing the above products, many said I was crazy. They said, “All 13 companies are struggling with quality, etc.” My answer was, “You can be crazy and still have a good idea.’ Today there are three of us left in the U.S. We are doing just fine.”

What advice would you offer a young entrepreneur who wants to start a family run business? Follow your dreams. Stick to it. If you feel it in your heart, run with it. Don’t give up. Be prepared to dream in the sky with your feet planted firmly on the ground.

And another thing: As a U.S. manufacturer of closed cell buns, Monmouth offers all the things that the government is trying to do to bring business back. The firm believes its business model works, products proudly made in the U.S.

WEBSITE: http://monmouthrubber.com/

Bondaflex Saves Over 27 Million Pounds Of The Earth’s Resources

TECHNICAL REPORT: Bondaflex Saves Over 27 Million Pounds Of The Earth’s Resources

For the past 27 years, the Bondaflex process has eliminated the need for over 27 million pounds of organic industrial production in the form of oil and natural gas, as well as a multitude of chemicals used in the rubber industry. Our landfills have been spared the dumping of 35 million pounds of scrap rubber over the past 27 years.

For each pound of Bondaflex product one pound of carbon dioxide is saved and .1 pounds of oil is saved.

GLOBAL WARMING

NJ Neoprene Sponge & Foam Manufacturer Stays True to Green Commitment, Does More With Less - Monmouth Rubber & Plastics Corp, 75 Long Branch Avenue Long Branch, NJ 07740 U.S.A | 1-888-362-6888

With its Bondaflex process Monmouth has been doing its part to lower greenhouse gases for over 27 years. Industry has continued to increase its participation as responsible environmental stewards of the earth’s environment. Government regulations and industrial requirements will continue to drive new and improved ways of recycling the waste stream on the planet. Monmouth’s commitment to continuous improvement of the environmental impact that industry has on the planet is second to none. Monmouth’s Bondaflex process is eco-efficient.

“0” EMISSIONS FOR OUR PLANET –
THE MONMOUTH GUARANTEE

Bondaflex has reduced the need for over one million pounds of new rubber production per year at the Long Branch factory due to the use of Bondaflex for gasketing applications where virgin rubber would have been used.


If you would like more information about the items in technical report please contact me.

JOHN M. BONFORTE SR
Technical Director
[email protected]

A Super Design – Chrysler taillight gaskets improved with cellular NORDEL

Rear lamp housings on Chrysler’s 1981 K car sedans originally were sealed to the body sheet metal with laminated, composite gaskets made of two polymeric plastic foams.

One material was chosen for its conformability to sheet metal, and the other for its compatibility with the ABS plastic lamp housing. Unfortunately, a moisture infiltration problem developed and another look had to be taken at the gasket design by Chrysler’s exterior lighting specialists. Their solution? A single component, low density cellular elastomeric gasket.

Rear lamp housings on Chrysler’s 1981 K carIn 1974, Monmouth commercialized the world’s first 100% EPDM, low density,closed cell sponge. Proprietary Durafoam technology allowed Monmouth to produce C191XLDS in densities as low as to 2.0 pounds per cubic foot. One outstanding, commercially successful application for this technology was as a sealing gasket for all Chrysler tail lamps. In 1979, Monmouth was successful in having Durafoam C191XLDS introduced at Chrysler as the only approved source under MSAY 527 A, B, & C.

Durafoam C191XLDS (100% EPDM) solved a major leakage problem Chrysler had on its “K” cars. Durafoam C191XLDS, with its attributes of softness, conformity and 100% closed cell rubber structure, allowed for foolproof sealing of Chrysler’s tail lamp gaskets. Monmouth was recognized by Dupont on its literature for this significant achievement and problem solving technology.

The redesigned taillight seal, used in early May on all Plymouth Reliant and Dodge Aries sedans, is made of Monmouth Rubber & Plastic’s Durafoam 100% EDPM. The material, based on DuPont’s NORDEL hydrocarbon rubber, not only provides a superior seal by virtue of its exceptionally low density and uniform load deflection, but also is less expensive than alternative composite or molded gasket designs.

The Durafoam taillight gasket is supplied as a die-cut part with a pressure-sensitive adhesive on one side ready for attachment to the body sheet metal. With a density of only 64mg/cm3 (4 lb./cu. ft.), the soft sponge rubber seal “forgives” dimensional tolerances and minor surface variations between the lamp housing and body. The heat resistance of NORDEL carries the gasketing safely through the paint bake oven in the factory and its closed cell structure effectively excludes water and weather from teh lamp interior on the road. Monmouth Rubber also supplies Durafoam gasketing of NORDEL, per Chrysler specifications, for several other body and chassis seals on the 1981 K cars. Familiarity with the product in these earlier successful applications, we assume, gave the designers some confidence in trying it for its latest use.

In any event, a Chrysler engineer who participated in the redesign of the taillight seal told us, “It’s early to make an unqualified evaluation, but I feel this new gasket is doing a super job for us.

Monmouth Rubber & Plastics Guarantees to Recycle Everything!

Monmouth Rubber and Plastics Corp., a privately- held manufacturer of cellular rubber and plastics materials located on the Jersey Shore, has recently announced an expansion of its unique recycling program to include all products, scrap and shipping materials that it provides to every one of its North American customers.

“If Monmouth sold it, Monmouth will take it back and recycle it,” said company founder and President John M. Bonforte Sr., speaking from his offices in Long Branch, New Jersey.

Monmouth manufactures the trademarked products Durafoam™, a closed cell sponge rubber and plastic foam; Airaflex, an open cell sponge rubber and foam product; and Duraflex solid rubber and plastic sheeting in buns, sheets, rolls and stripping. The recycling process itself revolves around Monmouth’s proprietary system Bondaflex, which makes marketable products from recycled composites of rubber and plastic.

Bonforte has been involved in recycling rubber materials since the early 1960’s, when, he says, “there was a different political atmosphere,” which did not encourage the reuse of scrap materials. In 1963, Bonforte put together a recycling program for Rubatex, his employer at the time. By 1967, he had left his employer to become the president of Monmouth Rubber Corporation (the company changed its “doing business as” name to Monmouth Rubber and Plastics in 1995). The company employs 55 people, seven of whom work exclusively in recycling, at its 52,500 square foot facility.

Everyone wants to be in recycling until they find out what its really about,” says Bonforte. “To have a successful recycling program, you have to have three elements: the technology, a marketable product, and someone to buy the product. It’s like a three-legged stool, and you need all three legs for the stool to be balanced. For instance, everyone wants to be into tire shredding. You pay $250 thousand for equipment, and people pay you to take the scrap tires, but then what? If you can’t sell it to someone, or you don’t have a government subsidy, in all too many cases you don’t have a business. We have the technology to recycle the material we get into a whole host of products, and we have developed the market to sell those products.”

Monmouth marketplace contains almost every conceivable industry, including aerospace, transportation, construction, gasketing, and the athletic and medical industries, and is currently either selling or sampling products into every automobile manufacturer.

Monmouth has been involved in various types of recycling technology almost since Bonforte took over the company, but that aspect of the company has grown tremendously since the 1980’s, when government regulations started to become more friendly toward recycling. “Back then, big business was the in thing. There weren’t tax breaks for recycling, and no one from the business schools wanted to know what an entrepreneur was. Regulations weren’t designed with recycling in mind. Now, entrepreneurship and environmental quality are the in things, and that new atmosphere in government, corporate America and all over the planet is one of the reasons that we have been so successful in expanding our recycling business.”

Monmouth also runs programs to obtain the scrap needed for the Bondaflex process from outside sources. To seek new streams of material, the company send out a 1-page fax that they call “Turn Your Trash Into Cash,” in which they offer to purchase scrap from the company receiving the fax. The fax lists the types of scrap Monmouth is looking for, including scrap of open and closed cell sponge; solid, cured and uncured rubber; polyethylene; neoprene; SBR; EPDM; nitrile; polyethylene and PVC, among other products. “Basically, any hydrocarbon,” said Bonforte. Monmouth may even pay for shipping, depending on the product involved. “The response to Turn Your Trash Into Cash is overwhelming,” said Bonforte.

According to Bonforte, Monmouth is also the only company in the industry that will recycle rubber products that already have adhesives affixed to them. “As far as we know, Monmouth’s recycling programs are unique in the industry,” said Tim Mlnarik (That’s: M L N A R I K), Technical Products Marketing Manager for MACtac, a manufacturer of adhesives located in Stow, Ohio, which sells Monmouth a number of adhesive products. “We don’t know of anyone else doing this, or who has a system capable of doing this,” he said.

Due in large part to the success of the Bondaflex technology, Monmouth is expanding. The company is currently installing manufacturing equipment that will more than double its current 10,000,000 (ten million) bd. Ft. per year capacity.

The Bondaflex process is based on controlled particle size and particle size distribution, and creates innovative products offering high density materials at a cost-effective price, according to the company’s press release. The products made through this process are used in component parts for automobiles, federally specified concrete expansion joint applications, industrial components, and packaging requiring high density with low costs such as underpadding for playground equipment. The latest recycled product to become available commercially available is recycled non-crosslinked and crosslinked polyethylene foam and EVA foam. The company has been visited by representatives from businesses around the world, most recently Taiwan, seeking an understanding of the proprietary recycling process, and Monmouth is positioning itself to sell the recycling technology to interested companies throughout the world. Plans are also underway to offer a similar recycling program to the European community through Monmouth’s UK partner Rubber & Plastics Converters.

It requires a total commitment.” says Bonforte. “Its like part of a food chain. You need a synergism to all of the components for the recycling process to be a commercial success. Its not difficult to do it right. It just requires education and the will to make it work.”

Says Mlnarik: ” There are environmental issues in the industry. Probably 90% of products are not recycled, so there is an environmental impact. When someone like (Bonforte) has the ability to do what he does we applaud their work and are sympathetic to them.”

 

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